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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdered in britain whose investigation and court case made front page headlines. those allegations did not come to light until almost a decade later, after brooks had scaled the corporate ladder to become chi
rupert murdoch and his son james for hours and hearing televised all over the world. murdoch's media empire has been rocked by accusations of police payoffs, phone hacking and corruption at his british newspapers. and troughout the hearing, all of the charges kept coming back to one central question. take a listen. >> do you accept that ultimately, you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> you are not responsible? who is responsible? >> the people that i trusted to run -- and then maybe the people they trusted. >> the murdochs did their best to distance themselves from the worst allegations, but the question still remains what exactly did they know? and what actions did they condone? one lawmaker thinks they know more than they let on. >> are you familiar with the term willful blindness? >> mr. sanders, would you care to elaborate? >> it is a term that came up in the enron scandal. willful blindness is a legal term. if there is knowledge that you could have had and should have had, but chose not to have, you are still responsible. >> mr. sanders, do you have a question? re
's biggest companies going down now that the inner circle of rupert murdoch is crumpling. >> we were spending money on private investigators doing these practices. >>> free at last, or is she? >> caylee! >> out of jail but will casey anthony ever have a moment of peace? and what was she thinking? attacking a judge? security officers to the rescue. >> she was not remorseful at all actually. >> and what is she thinking with these nails? >> do you frighten children ever? >> one on one with the nail lady. it's all right here, right now on cnn. >>> good evening, everyone. i'm don lemon. we begin with the stunning turn of events and the deepening and embarrassing hacking and bribery scandal infecting fox news channel's parent company news corp. tonight, rebecca brooks who headed up the newspapers is out on bail after her arrest earlier in the day. another shocker. the head of the same department that arrested brooks, london's metro police commissioner falls victim to the same widening scandal. >> i have taken this decision as a consequence of the ongoing speculation with news international at a sen
giant rupert murdoch. a closer look at the young wife leepg to her husband's defense. >>> plus from the streets to the stage you'll meet the korea's got talent star who is wowing the world. >>> you might remember susan boyle the woman whose voice captured the world's attention during her performance on the television show britain's got talent. now korea's got talent has discovered a new voice with an amazing story behind it. here is cnn paula hancock in seoul. >> reporter: trying to calm those last minute nerves, he seems just like thousands of other hopefuls on korea's got talent. but he's not. >> reporter: for the next ten years he lived on the streets selling gum and energy drinks. he slept in stairwells or public toilets. and then came this. ♪ >> reporter: this powerful baritone voice from a 22-year-old is as impressive as his determination to pull himself from the streets to the stage. his rendition of the italian song, "in my fantasy" reduced the judges and audience to tears. choi says he still feels uncomfortable being a part of the competition. >> reporter: but he did make
want to get back to our top story, in-depth look into the phone hacking scandal at rupert murdoch's news corp. matthew, first to sean hoare's death, not suspicious, that's what police say, but certainly a strange turn of ooenchevents. >> another bizarre twist. sean hoare, one of the main whistle blowers, first journalist to go on record to accuse andy coulson, former editor of "news of the world" and former director for david cameron, not just knowing about the phone tapping that he alleges went but condoning it and encouraging it. he appeared in the press with more controversy. saying that they had access to sensitive police technology for cash payments, by using what's called pinging to pinpoint through mobile phone signals, the whereabouts of people they wanted to track down. that was another scandal he blew the whistle on, a few moments before he was found dead. we don't know the exact reason for his death at this point. there will be an autopsy i suspect. another twist in the ongoing saga. >> by the time we finish the segment on the show, things could have changed already. t
fighting for his reputation. you will see rupert murdoch's very public apology and a man who used to work for one of his newspapers talks to cnn. and critics say that the rochester police force there has some explaining to do. are they protecting people or is it harassment? >>> take a look at the nails. how does she function everyday? well, she will show us later on in the show. and you are on social media and we are, too. you can reach out on twitter or facebook on cnn.com/don and on foursquare.com as well. my book is called "transparent" available at e version or get it there or anywhere books are sold. geico, saving people money on more than just car iance. ♪ geic ♪ ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] more people are leaving bmw, mercedes and lexus for audi than ever before. experience the summer of audi event and get over 130 channels of siriusxm satellite radio for 3 months at no charge. a network of possibilities. in here, the planned combination of at&t and t-mobile would deliver our next generation mobile broadband experience to 55 million more americans, many in small towns and rural
to be on james and rupert murdoch who are also going to be grilled by lawmakers in parliament on tuesday. they will be answering questions on just how much they knew about these alleged phone hackings. when did they know it. and if they did know about it sooner, why didn't they put a stop to it then? >> you might argue rupert murdoch is the last of the media barons but could this be the event that unravels his massive media empire. we'll talk about that later this hour. >> i just can't even concept a mother that could do this to her children. it tears me apart. >> do they know -- >> a jury said not guilty 12 days ago but that woman's judgment you just heard likely will follow casey anthony even as a free woman. after being under police and public scrutiny for nearly three years the mother acquitted of murdering her daughter is at an undisclosed location. officers released her just after midnight from a jail in orlando. martin savage was there. she left by the front door. was anybody expecting her to do that? >> reporter: no. this case has progressively been one surprise after another. fo
reputation. you'll see rupert murdoch's very public apology and a man who used to work for one of his newspapers talks to cnn about the scandal involving his london paper. did management know what its reporters were doing? and critics say the rochester new york police, the force there has some explaining to do. are they protecting people or is it harassment? and take a look at these nails. how does she function every day? she'll show us later on in this show. you can reach out to us on twitter, facebook, cnn.com/don and on four square.com, as well. my book is called "transparent." it's available in e version or anybody books are sold. >> shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! shame on you! >> now to the scandal. heads are rolling at his company news corp and murdoch forced to do something he's not used to doing, apologize. he took out gigantic ads in seven british papers today saying we are sorry for the phone hacking scan zal at the news of the world is, the popular tabloid he just shut down and in his own words -- >> well, the scandal is widening to another paper. "the sunday tim
came out. allegations its staffers hacked into the phones of celebrities. rupert murdoch was seen reading the last ed igts. told 200 people laid off they can apply for jobs elsewhere in the company. a report from london, straight ahead. >>> britain's prince william and his wife catherine are heading home after their whirlwind tour of california and canada. the royal newkne newlyweds left an inpregs. prince william hailed the troops that he called the front lines of a remarkable relationship between the u.s. and britain. >>> a nasa space shuttle is now docked with the international space station for the final time. the "atlantis" is delivering supplies and spare parts. it will return to earth in two weeks marking the end of nasa's shuttle program. >>> all right. it is oppressive. it is unrelenting, and it is getting downright unsafe out there. i'm talking about the heat, of course, in many areas. they are or will be under heat advisories. turning to our meteorologist jacqui jeras to show us where the intense heat will be, jacqui. >> it's terrible and covers so much of country. over
owned by rupert murdoch comes to an end after a scandal. that report is next. >>> and we're going to take you live to l.a. for the latest on the british royal couple's visit to the u.s. >>> according to the u.s. census, more than 120 million americans are self-employed, some become business owners before graduating high school. steve perry introduces us to a couple in tonight's perry's principles. >> reporter: mia is not your typical 18-year-old, she's met the president, rang the bell at the new york stock exchange and started a business. >> you started a vegan cookie business in high school? >> yes, yes. the summer after tenth grade. my parents became vegan when my mom contracted breast cancer 11 years ago. >> what did you know about business? >> just what i learned in the month of nefty. it inspires students to stay in school, by tapping into their interest to create businesses. her bakery won the $10,000 grand prize. businessman turned teacher founded nefty in 1987. he was inspired after he was mugged by some kids in new york city. >> if you can start teaching young people abou
's phones. rupert murdoch shut it don't. does he have a lot of exposure here? >> huge. >> monetary? >> monetary. some of his editors are looking at criminal charges. a corporation can be charged with murder and manslaughter. it's happened in the united states and united kingdom. when you think about what really happen it's so shocking to the conscience, so offensive. they are alleged to have hacked into a missing girl, 13-year-old girl's cell phone voice box while she was still missing. they were deleting messages to make room for more voice males to come in. the police officers and that little girl still missing thought she was still alive. that killer went on to kill two other women before he was caught. we are talking huge exposure. they knew about this. this is not the only case they are alleged to have done it in. this one enrages the people most. >> when we talk about exposure, what about here in the united states? does it make a dumps? he owns the fox news organization here and then he owns "news of the world" there. his entire company. >> yes. absolutely. this is a conglome
the investigation to other companies and rupert murdoch is back in the united states after facing tough questions from members of the british parliament. analysts believe murdoch and his son james managed to cape the damage to their company news corp. but the damage is jaw-dropping as how sleazy some of tactics were. cnn a cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: like the "news of the world" it appears every one everywhere was fair game. actors. business tycoons. royals. prime ministers. politicians. all potential front page fodder caught up in a type of scandal driven journalism that bordered on blood sport. allegedly involving hacking, tracking and outright bribes. >> they very much crossed the line and they didn't just do it once or twice. we are not talking about a single rogue reporter. apparently, it happened at least 4,000 times. >> reporter: media executive bonnie fuller has been the driving force behind magazines like "star" "us weekly." you have a much stronger takedown culture in the british tabloids. they are much nastier than anything you would find there and they do look to tear down pe
of the newsstands were sold out of the paper. the question is, right now, what's going to happen to rupert murdoch? he made an appearance at news international, the parent company of news of the world. briefly cameras caught him driving in with his suv there, but the question is, is this going 20 have is a trickle it down effect on his other media companies, and the big thing i want to point out here is that, you know, the main point of contention, it's one thing if you go after celebrity, political figure, public persona, but the thing is -- if you're going after your viewers, your readers, that's a whole other ball game. you know? that's what was the tipping point for a lot of this. >> the prime minister is really upset about its operations. we'll see. because i was told by someone who has legal knowledge that this is going to be a huge deal playing out. >> absolutely. not over yet. >> moving on talking about another story. a cruise ship in russia, sinks. one person dead. 88 missing? and 88 missing or 84 dead? how many are dead here? >> this is the thing. you have this double-decker cruise ship.
and bribery of public officials. as many of you know, this paper is owned by rupert murdoch. murdoch's news corp. is at the center of the scandal related to alleged phone hacking in britain. "the post's" editor says the documents are being preserved, quote, in light of what has gone on in london at "news of the world." >>> well, also, we are having open tryouts right here on cnn for a new meteorologist. take a look. how do you think this guy's going to do? fabio's fabulous weather report is coming your way. it's eight past the hour. stay with me. i remember the days before copd. my son and i never missed opening day. but with copd making it hard to breathe, i thought those days might be over. so my doctor prescribed symbicort. it helps significantly improve my lung function, starting within 5 minutes. symbicort doesn't replace a rescue inhaler for sudden symptoms. with symbicort, today i'm breathing better, and that means... game on! symbicort is for copd, including chronic bronchitis and emphysema. it should not be taken more than twice a day. symbicort may increase your risk of lung infec
gup affiliated with anonymous also hacked "the sun." the paper owned by rupert murdoch, who's got plenty of other hacking headaches of his own right now. here's what the group did to the front page. faking a story about murdoch dying. anonymous and like-minded groups rely on the faceless, the nameless nature of the internet to get away with their trespasses. but authorities say they know who at least some of them are. this week the fbi arrested 16 alleged members of anonymous here in the u.s. and another five in europe. most of them are charged in the cyber-attack on paypal in december. hackers at paypal, mastercard and visa, after they cut ties with the whistleblower site wikileaks. they've become faus for videos like these -- ♪ >> as a wise man once said, an era doesn'ttened on depend -- doesn't depend on a state until you refuse to correct it. >> all right. i want to bring in our tech expert now. daniel seberg. what do we know about who anonymous is? >> reporter: as you might imagine, a group who calls itself anonymous, they do not want to know -- do not want you to know who
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)